Lacto-Fermented Kimchi

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Kimchi is a delicious fermented food. Full of great probiotics, it helps with digestion and overall health. Though Kimchi isn’t as simple as making sauerkraut, it’s totally worth the extra work to get such wonderful flavor.

Kimchi is Korean Sauerkraut. It has a great bite, and depending on how hot the chili peppers are, it can be pretty spicy. My absolute favorite way to eat it is mixed with chicken and peanut sauce, either in a wrap or as a stirfry.
Traditionally, it is made with napa cabbage, but in central Montana, that is not always easy for me to find, so I’ve used regular green cabbage and find it works just as well.

Lacto-Fermented Kimchi

Ingredients:
1 cabbage
1 bunch of green onions
3 carrots
1 bunch radishes
1 tablespoon fresh ginger
4 cloves garlic
2 tablespoons dried chili peppers or 3 fresh chili peppers
4 teaspoons sea salt
I use a skinny glass to compress
the veggies as much as possible.

1 teaspoon whey per mason jar (optional, if not using whey, double the salt)
~

4 pint jars with lids
Directions:
Thinly slice cabbage and green onions. Grate carrots, radishes, ginger and garlic. Dice peppers, if you are using fresh.
Combine everything, except the whey, stirring and mashing. Allow to rest for an hour, this lets out more the juices, which is helpful.
Evenly pack 4 pint jars. Add 1 teaspoon why per jar. I use a skinny glass to compress the veggies as much as possible.
Add a little water, if needed, so that the veggies are covered with liquid.

Set at room temperature for 3 days and then transfer to the refrigerator.

And the kimchi is ready to eat!
Add a little water, if needed,
so that the veggies are covered with liquid.
If left unopened, kimchi should last a couple months, once open, use within 2 weeks.
As with any ferment, if there is mold or unpleasant smell, discard. (I’ve never had my kimchi mold.)
Makes 4 pint jars full
Set at room temperature for 3 days and then transfer to the refrigerator.
And the kimchi is ready to eat!
This post is part of Well Fed Wednesday.
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Comments

  1. says

    I am glad you posted this as I have been planning to do some kimchi but didn’t realize that you could use regular green cabbage. I have my own garden and planted Chinese cabbage ( simalar to napa ) so I could make kimchi but it didn’t head, just went to seed. I guess I will have to grow it in the fall instead. I even saw some plants at the seed store that was also putting up seed stalks. I am into healthy but doing it as simply as possible. Lacto fermenting works for me, I even ferment my orange juice. Keep up the good work.

  2. says

    I do not like all the other veggies in my kimchi, if I used more cabbage would it ferment the same as you are saying, or are the carrots/radishes needed for the juice/fermentation in your recipe?

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