How Children Can Benefit From Simple Living

How Children Can Benefit From Simple Living

The main reason I became a minimalist was to live in the moment. To be present with my family and friends.

Too many times I would be with my family, but my mind would be elsewhere. Often on the cluttery surfaces surrounding us, the kitchen that needed serious work, the unfinished craft projects and all those unread self-help books that were supposed to change all that.

It took me many years to declutter to the extent that I needed and wanted and when I finally did, I had to learn to live in the moment.

There wasn’t anything left on my to-do list. The kitchen was clean, the surfaces surrounding us were clear and everything was put away.

But I still wasn’t present.

I had been so used to my mind being other places, I didn’t know how to live here and now and be with my family.

I’m a busy person. I enjoy working and I enjoy having projects in progress. I love goals and getting things accomplished.

I had to shift my goals- from decluttering and cleaning, to just being. I have my routines, and after they are done I have to tell myself that it’s time to sit and be.

The most difficult part of that for me, is I was so used to doing, it was uncomfortable to just be.

I still have to remind myself that I am where I want to be. I know that building a strong relationship with those in my life is my purpose.

I have to shut the computer down and turn off my phone.

It takes a lot of effort to let go of those distractions.

Living with intentionality isn’t always easy. The draw of social media is strong and feels so much more rewarding than just sitting and being.

But being is more important.

Independent play is vital for our children and their developing brain. <1,2> But they need to see an example.

Be that example.

Sip your coffee and watch the sunrise… without your phone.

Do things that you enjoy- garden, draw, read, hike, fish.

Our culture is so consumed with technology, that it’s hard to turn it off. Sometimes it can even feel like withdrawal symptoms. But work through it.

It’s not always exciting either. Life isn’t one thrill after another. It’s simple and not always entertaining. But it’s important.

Be content to just be.

 

Have you made it a point to turn off technology? How has it impacted your life? Let me know in comments below.

About the author, Rachel

Hi there! I’m the Joyful Space Specialist. it’s my desire help others create a joyful space of their own and enjoy their time spent at home.

6 Comments

  1. Angela on 04/08/2015 at 4:33 PM

    Going through this right now with my husband and our one year old son. I told my husband, “Do you really want your son’s memory of you to include you playing video games on your phone?” I didn’t have to say anything else.

    We have recently minimized our belongings except for a book collection which we will never part with. I agree that it is strange to have nothing to tackle, nothing to clean, nothing to shop for. If I need to go shopping for a particular item, I no longer feel the need to look, there is absolutely nothing to buy. It’s strange, but freeing at the same time. Lovely blog. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

  2. The cluttered minimalist on 04/09/2015 at 3:44 AM

    no social media. I mean i still have a personal Facebook account but I check it maybe once a week to see on the off chance someone I don’t see in person is trying to get ahold of me. No smartphone games.
    I don’t keep my phone on me at all times. Notifications are turned off. I check things purposefully, when I’m interested. For kids, no video games during the school week unless it’s a special treat. In car rides books are read unless it’s dark out.
    I really have no problem cutting out technology. 🙂 but I enjoy using it as well!

  3. Jill on 04/14/2015 at 6:15 PM

    I find the same to be true for me. I love to make lists and then check off all the things when I do them. I love to make plans. It’s hard for me to just be in the moment. It’s something that I have been working on, but, as you said, it feels uncomfortable. I now recognize and know that I don’t need to fill every moment, but I still struggle with actually finding the quiet in the quiet moments. It makes me feel jumpy, but I will keep at it.

  4. Damaris on 04/15/2015 at 2:37 AM

    We too have Monday and usually Wednesday’s as No tech days. Have had for years. My phone not only is usually on silent but I don’t even have my vibrate anymore, as I found it still distracted me. We have now brought in a request that when people visit they do the same. Phone on silent or off. It helps them too. Some have even taken it on in their own homes…
    One thing I like to say to myself is… God made human beings not doings… God rested on the 7th day, not for His benefit but for ours…
    Thanks for a wonderful and inspirational blog xo

  5. Evolving Mojo on 05/04/2015 at 5:34 AM

    Great article! I have recently left the corporate world to be home with my 2 children . Learning to slow down and appreciate the moment. I want this for my family but it is hard to do! Cannot wait to reap the rewards of a simpler life.

  6. Gina on 06/19/2017 at 6:32 PM

    My father was a photographer and always had his camera. So we have many good photos from childhood. But I felt like I always had to be taking pictures of everything! Every event, every cute thing my child did, etc. I realized one day that Iwas missing out on what was happening because I was fooling with my camera or phone. I never got to really enjoy the time. And most of the photos were either not good or they would sit on my computer or phone needing to be decluttered (one more undone project hanging over my head). I finally realized that it was not worth taking fuzzy photos from the audience every time the preschool sang, especially since I always missed out on enjoying the event. I am much more picky about what photos I take now so I can actually enjoy the moment. When I do take photos I go through them right away and delete what I do not want to keep.

Leave a Comment